Fishing Reports

154 reports totalpages: 1 2 3 4 ... 26 Next >>
Pacific Coast of Guatemala - August 8th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny, with rain
  • 85 ° F 
  • Fishing: Excellent
 FISHING REPORT 08-08-2014

Off season....Great Day.

10 Sailfish Raised with 9 Bites resulting in 7 Releases.
Two big Mahi Mahi (35 Pounds) and 
One big Mackerel.
Thanks Darwin and crew for venturing out in the rainy season.
 
Pacific Coast of Guatemala - February 27th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Hot
  • 75 ° F 
  • Fishing: Excellent
 
Pacific Coast of Guatemala - February 14th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 87 ° F 
  • Fishing: Excellent
 
 
Pacific Coast of Guatemala - November 11th, 2013
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 75 ° F 
  • Fishing: Excellent

FISHING REPORT

DATE:              November 11, 2013

BOAT:             Monkey Business

CAPTAIN:       Tito  (Tiro Loco)

CLIENT :         Mr. Stephen Guynes and Friend

SAILFISH:        Raised 14, Bites 13,  Released 6

BLUE MARLIN:  Raised 2, Bites 2, Released 0

MAHI MAHI:  2 of  30 Pounds each.

 
Pacific Coast of Guatemala - November 4th, 2013
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny, with rain
  • 70 ° F 
  • Fishing: Excellent
 John henry.

 

 

 

The trip: Three days sailfishing in Iztapa GUA out of BuenaVistaSportfishing, Oct 27, 28, 29.  29 cat “Monkey Business”.  Cruised to grounds in low 20’s and ride smooth both ways  Every day.  Days 1 & 2 were good, day three is what GUA sailfishing is all about.

 

Day 0: Tom forgets passport and has to return home to get it.  Misses plane in Atlanta and rebooked on later flight.  He arrives GUA 2 hrs. late.  Drinks on arrival, snacks by the pool Coconut fired shrimp followed by shrimp Bisque  and dinner of fresh grilled Dolphin.  Tom looks around place and said “I want to live here”

 

Lodge:  new restaurant & marina complete so you watch captain and mate ready boat while you eat breakfast – Fruit plate followed by eggs, pancakes, bacon.  Food top notch  Everything much improved.  Staff over the top.

 

Day 1:  6 Am wakeup to coffee and juice before breakfast.  Drizzle to light rain during breakfast and ride to grounds.  Everybody has tee shirt and shorts rain gear.  Warm enough so it’s refreshing, not uncomfortable.  Lose first sail at 9:15.  Capt. & mates teaching Tom to set up and hook his own fish.  Tome loses 3, I tag two and Tom loses 1.  Tom is practicing on Dolphin – caught a 15 and a 20.  Day take: many fish in baits, hooked 5, tagged 2.

 

Day 2: Same wake up, but overcast and no drizzle.  On grounds about 9, a little bumpier than I like but easily fishable.  Tom gets 2 more Dolphin , one a 30.  The dolphin don’t hook easy on circles and we consider them  bycatch.  His learning is going well – dolphin are good practice.  Day total lost 2 tagged 2.

 

Day 3: sky clear, no breeze.  Ocean perfect.  Ran about 30 miles and first fish in the boat about 9:30.  Two more practice dolphin in 20’s then serious sailfishing.  Lost 5, tagged 6 lost 1 in tagging attempt at boat side.  Two highlights third day.  A) found and followed free swimming 20 foot female Orca for several miles.  Orca alone and cruising about 9 knots.  Blew so close to the boat twice even Deaf john heard it and got some spray.  incredible.  Tried for pics but digital didn’t do too well.  B)  While following Orca got two on at same time.  Got mine first, tagged and away, followed by Tom, tagged and away.  By now it’s 2 PM and we decided to fish a few more minutes and tagged 2 more singles.  Left for home at 3.

 

Day 4: ate breakfast, packed and went to airport.  Easy flights home.  In my house at 11:30.

 

 

Trip totals: tagged 10, lost one at boat side, hooked 10 more that we saw jump but shook hooks.  Broke lines twice.  Carried two of my 20 lb. class shark rods.  Caught more than half the fish on my two – the orangeieboom was top performer.   Had we let mate set up fish, we would have tagged out.

And October is a slow month.  Nov is getting good, peak is Jan, Feb, Mar.

 

 

We were trolling about 45 Nautical miles off Iztapa Guatemala and the captain saw an Orca about half a mile ahead.  We trolled over by it - it was a young female about 20 feet long.  She was swimming in a straight line off shore (seemed to know where she was heading and going straight there).  She was alone and cruising about 9 knots.  Would come up and blow about once a minute and had no fear or interest in us.  A couple of times she blew so close to us, even deaf grandpa could hear her.  We ran beside her a mile or so and then hooked up two sails at once and pulled off to catch our fish.

 

That was way cool.  The pictures are not great  - my little pentax is not good at action shots but you can tell what it is.  It was way cool that she did not seem to care anything about us – I know she knew we were there – she just didn’t seem to care or mind us being there. 

 

Gives a whole new view to SeaWorld.

 

Questions – what is a nautical mile? A knot?  How did I know it was a female?    How fast is 9 knots?

 

Grand Dad.

 

 
Pacific Coast of Guatemala - October 29th, 2013
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 70 ° F 
  • Fishing: Excellent
  FISHING REPORT

DATE:  October 29, 2013

BOAT NAME: Monkey Business

CLIENT NAME:  John Henry and Tom McKibben

CAPTAIN: Cristóbal Mora (Tiro Loco)

SALFISH RAISED: 18   BITES:  13    RELEASED:  9
DORADO:  1 40 Pounds

NOTES: 40 Miles